Something Wicked

‘Tradition’ is not likely a word commonly associated with Juggalos, yet when it comes to that odd and often maligned little subculture, there does exist a unique sense of custom, ceremony, and certain things which might even be considered sacred.

This past Tuesday, Oct. 31st, Juggalos from around the world gathered at the Russell Industrial Center in Detroit, MI, for a double dose of Dark Carnival sacrament, coming in the form of the 24th annual Hallowicked Clown Show.

Hallowicked—the annual Halloween-night concert put on by the Insane Clown Posse—is one of the longest running traditions among the Juggalos. Halloween has always been the most beloved holiday in the Juggalo world; it’s reliance on masks and face paint fits right in with the whole clown thing, after all. It’s a night about self-expression and freedom, which are some of the most crucial ideas behind the Juggalo culture. That’s why the night has been celebrated with the annual Hallowicked Clown Show since 1994.

This year however, Juggalos gathered anticipating even more than the yearly celebration and family reunion. At this year’s Hallowicked, ICP will be unveiling the 4th Joker’s Card of the Second Deck.

Admittedly, that does warrant a bit of explaining.

The Joker’s Cards are the central albums of ICP’s mythology—each one expanding on the key themes of the culture while providing enough shocks, laughs, and groans to keep the masses content until the next release. The albums—each a fairly simplistic face on a (usually) black background—fast become icons of the Juggalo community.

While the original set was capped at 6 cards (7 albums), ICP began a second deck of Joker’s Cards with 2009’s phenomenal ‘Bang Pow Boom’.

Since then, they have released ‘The Mighty Death Pop’ (2012), and ‘The Missing Link’ (2015), among other non-Joker’s Card releases.

The Joker’s Cards simple symbolism makes them easy rallying banners for the uninhibited passion of the Juggalos, and their more often than not highly theatrical unveilings rank among the most anxiously anticipated events short of their actual release.

The faces and names of future Joker’s Cards have been revealed by phone numbers obtained by solving riddles on side-project Eps, hidden in the liner notes of other albums, and other such creative methods. More recently however, the custom has shifted towards huge public unveilings.

At Hallowickeds, Gatherings, and other such events past, ICP unfurl giant banners revealing the names and faces of their next project, and enthusiastic chants ensue. This is the sort of event Juggalos will travel for. Sure, they’ll travel just to see the band, or to hang out with other Juggalos, or to buy Faygo—but the unveiling of a Joker’s Card—that’s something truly special!

Which brings us back to the matter at hand. At Hallowicked this year, ICP promised to share the face of the fourth Joker’s Card of the second deck, just as they did for ‘The Mighty Death Pop’ (Revealed at Hallowicked 2010), and ‘The Missing Link’ (Revealed at Hallowicked 2014). The combination of the annual Hallowicked Clown Show, and the revealing of a new Joker’s Card makes this a truly thrilling event for Juggalos worldwide.

And so, they gathered; with painted faces and countless variations of clown-themed t-shirts. With lines forming at the crack of dawn, the Juggalos descended en masse upon the Russell Industrial Center in Detroit, MI. Naturally, this was an all-day event—with myriad musical acts, wrestling matches, exhibits, and countless other attractions throughout the day. Of course, it was to be capped off at the end by the main event—the Insane Clown Posse.

So when the time came, the eager Juggalos packed together tightly, and waited. Then, they waited some more. But the stage time came and went. So did midnight.

Not until nearly 1:00am local time, with Halloween technically behind them, did the ICP take the stage and the epitome of Hallowicked begin. As soon as they appeared, the wait seemed of little concern to the frantic Juggalos.

The Clowns rocked the audience with live standards such as ‘Hokus Pokus’, and ‘Chicken Huntin’, while adding in some scary surprises befitting the occasion, covering rare Halloween singles such as ‘Halloween on Military Street’, and ‘Sleepwalker’.

As the intro to 2015’s ‘Falling Apart’ teased in the background, Violent J took centre stage to proselytize that while Juggalos are usually weirdos and outcasts, on Halloween it’s cool to be scary. Its our night!

Late in the show, ICP broke into the old family favourite, ‘Dead Body Man’, bringing the congregation to a fever pitch.

Then, all went silent.

A cryptic chanting oozed from the speakers, and the first banner fell, bearing the name, ‘Fearless Fred Fury’.

The next banner held the face.

Juggalos roared their excitement for this new chapter of Dark Carnival lore.

The beat for ‘Real Underground Baby’ began—a rare song live, this closed the gruesome 2004 album, ‘The Wraith: Hell’s Pit’. This choice of closer may prove meaningful, as both the name and face of this new Joker’s Card forebode wicked times ahead.

‘Real Underground Baby’ continued as the party raged, with confetti, smoke, and eventually a full blown Faygo Armageddon—a storming of the stage and massive Faygo war which has become the traditional ending to any ICP event.

As the music faded away and the final Faygo flew, the crowds began to dwindle at last. Halloween was long over, but the feeling of Hallowicked still held strong as soaking and exhausted Juggalos filed out, dancing between chants of ‘Family’ and ‘ICP’, with grateful smiles beneath the smeared remains of their clown paint.

-Brad OH Inc.

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Juggalos, Nazis, and the Bi-Polar Face of the American People

Today, we have a special treat for all our readers. Head on over to our friends GonzoToday to read our exclusive article on last weekend’s ‘Juggalo March on Washington’!

-Click Here for the Article-

-Brad OH Inc.

‘Juggalos Vs. Nazis’

This Saturday, Sept. 16th, 2017, the Juggalos will march on Washington, DC. The Juggalos are marching in protest of the FBI decision to label them as a gang. It’s a particularly obnoxious decision from the Feds, and a dangerous precedent—to call a particular musical fanbase a criminal organization is a pretty slippery slope. But, all of that has been covered by us in the past. For more details on the situation and its significance, see the article here.

With only six days remaining until the march, you’d think there would be few surprises left to share, but a simultaneous group of protesters from Trump’s heinous ‘alt-right’ crowd have decided to show up in DC that same day, demonstrating to protect the purity of their blood, or ‘freedom’, or whatever other God-forsaken rally-cry their committee settles on.

This has garnered a surprising turn in the coverage of the event as a whole, with many media outlets suddenly considering the day less about the first amendment protected and the rather reasonable right to listen to music without being considered a criminal, and more of a super-event deemed: Juggalos vs. Nazis!

Now, one of the most impressive swerves caused by this is the stunning about-face of liberal media, suddenly clamouring to the side of the Juggalos. While it’s true that even most mainstream media outlets have been on board with the Clown’s regarding the gang designation, by and large, ICP and the Juggalos have been consistent media whipping boys for the better parts of their careers.

Previously, the majority of the liberal-media has slathered at the mouth for the chance to write about how trashy, ignorant, and deplorable the Juggalos are. Viewing them as little more than sub-human white-trash, Juggalos have been the long-standing ‘bye’ in the PC world—nothing said about Juggalos is rude or out-of-line…they’re just Juggalos, after all.

Interesting then, that after more than 25 years of their message, these very media outlets are finally starting to hear what ICP—and the Juggalos—have been saying all along.

Fuck racism.

Fuck hate.

They said it back in 1992, with ‘Your Rebel Flag’, and they said it in 2015, with ‘Confederate Flag’. In fact, the steadfast stance against bigotry and judgement has been among the defining ideas behind ICP’s music for the entirety of their careers.

But hey, if a clash with dangerously misled, knuckle-dragging Nazi’s is what it takes for people to see it, I guess we can work with that. But it’s about time…because this is a pretty important distinction to draw, and a train that the liberal-media has taken far too long to catch.

As trashy, poor, and odd as Juggalos may often be, it is essential—in times like this more than ever—to recognize the humanity within all people. Despite their circumstances, which are—as the press is quick to note—quite similar to those of the average ‘Trumpet-blower’—the Juggalos as a group have defined themselves by their hardline stance against bigotry and hatred, and by speaking out for human-rights and equality whenever they’re given a platform.

That’s just the sort of mindset the left so often claims to promote. So, it’s long overdue then, that they stop ridiculing Juggalos over differences in musical predilections, and start celebrating them for the wildly diverse, yet fiercely noble morality the group and its followers avow. Better late than never though, we know we’re a hard concept to grasp. Still, this Saturday, it will be the Juggalos on the frontlines—defending the first amendment, the right to enjoy what you want, and potentially, taking an inadvertent stand against the malignant hate and intolerance sweeping the United States.

Maybe…just maybe, some of these former naysayers will be willing to take that stand with them. If so, then hop on in, and welcome to the carnival…clowns.

-Brad OH Inc.

The Canadian Juggalo Weekend

On the days of April 7th and 8th 2017, the Marquee Beer Hall in Calgary, Alberta was the scene of the first ever Canadian Juggalo Weekend. From all across this great northern nation and beyond, painted faces converged on Cowtown to revel in the frenetic madness that is the Juggalo world.

Featuring live JCW Wrestling, carnival freak shows, and countless live music acts including the likes of Swollen Members, Onyx, 2-Live Crew and the one and only Ice T, each night was capped off in the blaze of Faygo drenched glory that only the Insane Clown Posse can provide. Night one featured a cover to cover performance of their seminal album, ‘Riddle Box’, while night two featured a raucous ‘hits’ show—both with more than enough Faygo to drown several dunk-tank carnies.

As if that wasn’t enough, each night included an after party, which saw ICP back on stage again to play the Juggalo equivalent of an acoustic set (sans Faygo) of rarely played songs like ‘I Get Mad’, ‘Get Off Me Dawg’, ‘Falling Apart’, ‘Santa Claus…’, and ‘Everybody Rize’. Needless to say, this made quite the impression on the eager Juggalos in attendance.

Of course, like any event put on by Psychopathic Records, the main event highlight was the Juggalo Family itself. If Juggalos live up to their reputation as a wild and crazy bunch, so too do they stay true to their own creed as a supportive and inclusive group of nut-jobs who would be hard pressed to fit in anywhere else besides an event such as this. Playful chants, wild mosh pits, crowd-surfing wheelchairs, and a greater sense of kinship and camaraderie than you’ll find at most real family reunions made the weekend a special treat both for those long acquainted with the ICP and their Juggalos, and first-timers alike.

While far from an inclusive list, much love goes to our good friend Hal for showing the gumption to check the scene out, and to Rick and Kim for being such fine compatriots and outstanding representatives of the Juggalo world. Much love to ICP and all of Psychopathic Records for bringing their one of a kind madness to Canada.

For so many songs and memories I could never have anticipated, and will now never let go, much clown love goes to ICP, Psychopathic Records, and the entire Juggalo world.

-Brad OH Inc.

Brad OH Inc. Featured on ‘GonzoToday’

cropped-cropped-blogbanner13.jpgToday on Brad OH Inc., we have a special item for all our dear readers. Rather than a new weekly post, we’re happy to share this article we’ve published through our good friends at GonzoToday.

Writing about the Insane Clown Posse and their ongoing legal battle against the FBI is nothing new for us, but when we were offered a chance to write something for a site like GonzoToday, we were happy to take the opportunity. Needless to say, this is a GonzoToday exclusive, and cannot be posted here (see publishers…we’re open to negotiations!), so follow the link below and check out our new article, ‘The Clown in Chief and the Juggalo Army’.

Click Here for Article.

-Brad OH Inc.

There Are Clowns?

The Gentleman Juggalo LogoThere are Clowns,

Among the trees,

In fields and bushes,

Where nobody sees. 

There are Clowns,

Out for the young,

Bent on killing their songs,

Long before they are sung.  

There are Clowns,

Outside of the school,

Their hellish grins asking,

Just who is the fool?

But there are Clowns in police cars,

And Clowns in the courts,

Clowns on the TV,

Reading news reports.

There are Clowns on the left,

And Clowns on the right,

Clowns that will lie to you,

Or tell you to fight.

 There are Clowns in the papers,

And Clowns at the prow,

Of our ship as we ponder,

Where we’re to go now.

There are Clowns who will promise,

Everything is fine,

And Clowns who will tell you,

Not to waste your time.

Clowns that will claim,

It’s all under control,

But those Clowns are demure,

When it’s time to console.

There are Clowns on the streets,

Clowns under our beds,

Clowns running our countries,

Clowns filling our heads.

Yes there are Clowns,

In all sorts of places,

But the Clowns I fear most,

Do not paint their faces.

 

This poem was inspired by the recent ‘Time’ Article by Violent J, which you can read here (Link).

 

-Brad OH Inc.

On Juggalos and Fanaticism

The Gentleman Juggalo LogoNothing I do elicits more abject disdain than my passionate enjoyment of the Insane Clown Posse. ‘Enjoyment’ may be a slight understatement mind you, I am a self-proclaimed Juggalo, and that comes with some pretty loaded implications.

Childish insults and hateful slurs aside, Juggalos are known for taking their musical-affections a step beyond most other fan-bases. In fact, I’ve heard it justly claimed that for Juggalos, the term ‘fan’ is short for ‘fanatical’. It’s as apt an analogy as any I could come up with, so I’m happy to appropriate it here—it’s true, Juggalos almost to the last are entirely fanatical about their love of ICP.

But behind this trend of obsession and fanaticism lies a deeper insight into the nature of the music—one perhaps that can be applied more broadly to all those things which bring some small sub-sect of people to their knees while being lost entirely on everyone else. A key part of this is the high entry point of the music, due to its very nature.

ICP are often accused of being vulgar, juvenile, or much worse. None of these labels are entirely untrue, but they also miss a big part of the picture, and the entire context. One of the chief reminders I give to people attacking the artistic merit of ICP is to consider what the letters stand for—they advertise it right up front; they are clowns.

So the silly and obscene is all a part of the act, but it’s the larger theme of this act which represents the buy-in, and that comes only to listeners who hang around long enough to read the brightly coloured writing on the big top walls.

You see, beneath the greasepaint and pantomime there is a much greater sense of sincerity that most casual listeners miss completely. It was Oscar Wilde who once claimed ‘give a man a mask and he’ll tell you the truth,’ and there could be no more perfect proof of this platitude than ICP. By donning their outlandish personalities and presenting their ideas as revelations from the ‘Dark Carnival’, ICP create a farcical mirror of reality through which they can comment on the deeper realities of life.

Each album is created around a central, all-encompassing theme: usually grounded in notions of facing your own sin after death, karmic retributions, and personal accountability. On each album, these themes are explored through songs shifting in perspective, point of view, and more often than not, even through the eyes of briefly encountered and little explored alter egos. Some songs will be bright, cheery, and seemingly of little substance, while others will be aggressive and dark—with the clowns claiming in the first person to commit heinous acts and hold despicable beliefs.

Seldom is the intention spelled out plainly, and the ICP leave it up to their listeners to sort out the clues and piece together the bigger picture. A lifetime of listening can certainly make this an easy process, but if a song like ‘You Should Know’ (Link) is your first introduction to the band, it’s understandable you’d be left with a pretty bad taste in your mouth.

Truly, to hear any single song out of context, one could easily assume some pretty awful things about the motivations and beliefs of the duo—and their fan-base. A thorough understanding requires a listener to immerse themselves in the lore of the band, the story of each album (Joker’s Cards), and eventually the Juggalo culture itself to fully suss out the depth of meaning in ICP’s music.

But herein lies the rub, and to my mind one of the most incredible things about art presented in this once-removed way. The high buy-in level acts as a sort of built-in gate-keeper for the music itself. It’s kind of like an ‘extreme’ sport. You really don’t see a lot of people merely dabbling in the hobby of wingsuits, and listening to ICP is no different.

It’s exactly why there is such a sharp divide between people who like ICP’s music (‘like’ being an admittedly weak description), and those who don’t (…or inevitably hate it with a passion). It’s an all or nothing situation. If you hear a bit and get turned off, you’ll think little of them ever again, and potentially fear their dedicated following. But if you do the work needed to understand them, you’ll emerge from the other end with a more secure understanding of the art of metaphor in general, and a ‘family’ of Juggalos banded together all the more tightly by their outlier status and shared vision. At that point, it’s only a matter of time before the baptismal Faygo shower makes it official—welcome to the family ninja!

-Brad OH Inc.