Madness, Misers, and the Miserable Prospect of 4 more Years Under Trump

It’s been a dark week—marred by cynicism and maligned by the self-serving greed of a party that claims to be for the people. The Democratic Primaries are tightening, with Buttigieg, Klobuchar, and O’Rourke all dropping out of the race just ahead of the crucial ‘Super Tuesday’—when 14 states cast their votes in the primary race.

Not only did this move clear the field, but also saw each of them endorse candidate Joe Biden, former Obama VP, and a veritable bag of bones who makes beige seem compelling. The choice is most often defended as an electability claim, which seems surprising in regards to a candidate with a pathetically dismal turnout prior to Tuesday—especially given his association with one of the most popular political figures of this generation in President Obama.

Endorsements mean more than they should though—that is to say, more than nothing—and Biden won big on Super Tuesday, landing him in the top spot, with 627 delegates to second place Sanders’ 551 at the time of this writing. The next closest competitor, Warren, held only 64 before dropping out on the 5th of March.

Following Super Tuesday, Scrooge McDuck imitator Bloomberg called it quits on his self-financed bid to buy the coveted spot as leader of the USA, also taking the opportunity to throw his support behind Biden.

This Biden love and the endless claims of electability may seem surprising, given that after the first three primary contests—prior to these endorsements—Biden held a measly 15 delegates to Sanders’ 45.

In truth, arguments that Sanders is not sufficiently ‘electable’ come down to one thing—the old Red scare. Fear of the second half of Sanders bandied ‘Democratic Socialism’ still has many below the Mason-Dixon line soiling their overalls; there’s no denying this fact. But Democratic Socialism is a far stretch from the Communism of old, as we have explored in past articles ‘On Bernie Sanders and Changing Economic Systems’, and ‘What is Democratic Socialism?’.

Still, Sanders and his solutions have become increasingly palatable to the citizens of America since 2016—and even then may have been the far superior choice over Clinton, as explored in the article, ‘Has Bernie Sanders Been Casting Pearls Before Swine?’.

No, it’s a fool who thinks this sudden surge of Biden love from the DNC is motivated by concerns of electability. They’d have learned that lesson last election. Biden is every bit the war-hawk, establishment crony that Clinton was, with less personality than tofu, and an obviously declining mental acuity. He’s a lame-duck candidate who’s already lost two presidential bids. He’s Hillary-light, and lacks even the potential marketability of ovaries. If he gets the nod and does even half as well as she did, it will give credence to nothing beyond the claims that Hillary’s failure to defeat Trump was due largely to America’s discomfort with having a woman at the helm. Either option is a dismal prospect.

No, these endorsements are about something else. No one in the arguably accomplished position of these 4 would be dense enough to tempt fate a second time with a weaker candidate. Trump is many things, and few of them have any proximity to even the most moderately positive traits. But he does have charisma, and he does inspire passion in his fanbase. If he faced Biden on the debate stage, he would devour the old fool—publicly masticating him to the slathering cheers of his ardent supporters.

It would be a god damn massacre.

So why take such a foolish gambit? Clearly, this is an age of extremes. An age of passionate adherence to alternatives, when both left and right seek to sunder themselves from the status quo of the establishment and take back control of their democracy. Trump has given the right that to a tee, and the fervent joy he’s inspired in his loyalists renders them blind to the turmoil he leaves in his wake.

Bernie is the only answer remaining to the left. He is a radical, and he has answers to counter any point of Trumps. Bernie has a plan, he has passion, he has charisma, and he puts people before self-interest. With full acknowledgement of this writer’s bias and personal political leanings, Bernie stands as the best option to help America move into a more progressive and egalitarian future than they’ve ever seen.

Sadly, these endorsements aren’t about any of that. Electability be damned. People, progressives, and democracy itself be damned. These are not progressives, and they barely befit the term democrat, save for the sad reality that the past decade has revealed this to be the very core of the DNC—to protect their own wealth. To live the status quo or die in its defense. That’s just what they are willing to do. For the DNC to repeat the mistakes of 2016 would be the nail in the coffin of their own slow suicide. It would almost certainly mean another 4 years of Trump, which to them would perhaps be the preferable choice over paying slightly more taxes so their constituents could live the ‘high-life’ of accessing the luxuries of health-care and affordable education.

So, the road ahead is a dreary affair, but not hopeless. One of the most interesting factors remaining to be seen is who former candidate Elizabeth Warren will endorse. Will she stick with her progressive aspirations, and join Sanders to create a potentially formidable alliance, or will she go the way of apathetic self-service as the rest have done?

The flow of time is the inevitability of progress. To deny the tides is to be washed away beneath them, and left like the statue of Ozymandias for history to forget.

The people will have their day. The old ways have died, and progress will not be halted forever. In these treacherous times, change is only going one of two ways: Bernie’s, or Trump’s.

The days of the establishment’s status quo are gone. In the past week, they have shown this more than any election ever could.

-Brad OH Inc.

A Lament for Henry Wallace

purelyspeculationOver the past year, we’ve written a lot about Bernie Sanders, the former Presidential Candidate and self-avowed ‘Democratic Socialist’ who showed America that their policies may yet be guided by decency and virtue as opposed to greed and the dark lust for power. Bernie failed to gain the nomination, and as we look around now, we can see that the forces of decency are certainly in peril. But let us remember that there are and have been men and women throughout history who will fight the good fight. We needed them then, and we certainly need them in the years to come.

In the past too have we needed such brave and selfless leaders, and today we look back at just such a man from one of the most infamously precarious times in the history of the nation, if not the world. That man is Henry A. Wallace.

In these present days of uncertainty, many are the men and women who will appeal—with righteous indignation and furious intention—to higher powers or political extremes. Sadly, it is far fewer who are willing to be that example in the face of adversity and defiance.

Henry A. Wallace was just such a man.

Throughout his political career, he made an unending effort to turn the political tides towards decency and good sense—even when such qualities were considered subversive, if not outright treacherous.

Wallace served as VP under FDR during WWII, and was an outspoken supporter of New Deal Liberalism, as well as a more cordial approach to dealing with the potential threat of the Soviet Union. He was staunchly opposed to the atomic bomb, but eventually found himself thrown off the democratic ticket and disastrously replaced by Henry Truman. How much of the imperialist decline and wanton destruction to come may have been prevented had Wallace taken the presidency rather than Truman?

Undeterred, Wallace continued as a force of decency and moral rationality, founding the Progressive Party in 1946 as an effort to combat the hardline policies Truman was enacting against the Soviet Union. These efforts, if successful, may have warded off much of the violence and dissolution of the Cold War to come (Link).

Throughout his life, Wallace was driven by a steadfast compulsion towards rationality and good judgement, favouring fairness and open dialogue to judgement and oppression. He was fanatically anti-racist in a time when racism was considered the accepted norm, and a staunch anti-imperialist even as the USA became the world’s most imperialist nation.

Wallace was both practically, and metaphorically the antithesis of McCarthyism. Not only did he fight against it in practice, he represented the polar opposite of ideals. Where McCarthy pushed for labelling, hysteria, and rule by fear, Wallace encouraged sound judgement, tolerance, and foresight.

Needless to say, this stance, and Wallace himself, was not without fault. There are few people indeed who can make the best of judgements at all times, particularity without the best sources of information. In 1952, Wallace published ‘Where I was Wrong’, reflecting on his soft stance towards Stalin’s regime, offering apologies for some of his positions, and recanting any sympathies in light of the war-crimes he learned Stalin had committed. To err is human, but to own that error, apologize directly, and make amends is sufficient in itself to cast even the most talented and noble of people from the sullied echelons of public-esteem.

So, dear readers, let us take a moment to lament the failures and rejection of our friend Henry A. Wallace. Though flawed and moreover disgraced, he was a man led by noble ambitions, and ever loyal to the truth of his beliefs. This is not the mould for political success by any means, and it is a rare thing for a political figure to be so recklessly unconcerned with reputation. To focus instead on decency and virtue is the trait which perhaps will forever segregate the likes of Wallace and Sanders from the highest offices of the American political process, but we can all pray to see more of their kind soon.

Indeed, such people—in all walks of life—are the best hope we have.

-Brad OH Inc.